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Sunday, August 11, 2013

The Alarming report on pork

Of nearly 200 pork samples tested by
Consumer Reports, many tested positive
for salmonella, listeria, staph bacteria.

The magazine says a whopping 69 percent
contained yersinia, which infects nearly
100,000 Americans every year. Children
are especially vulnerable.

Stephen Morse, of the Columbia University
School of Public Health, said, "You always
expect to find some bacteria in any meat
product. But those are usually harmless.
I think the real surprise here was to find
so many potentially disease-causing
bacteria."

Video



Bacteria made worse by antibiotics in factory farming
From CBS News:

For years, pork has been promoted by the industry as healthy food option -- "the other white meat." But the new report suggests otherwise.

Urvashi Rangan, Consumer Reports director of consumer safety and sustainability, said, "We found potentially harmful bacteria on most of the samples of pork that we tested. One organism we looked at, enterococcus, is more a measure of filth indication, maybe fecal contamination."

Of nearly 200 pork samples tested by Consumer Reports, many tested positive for salmonella, listeria, staph bacteria. The magazine says a whopping 69 percent contained yersinia, which infects nearly 100,000 Americans every year. Children are especially vulnerable.

Stephen Morse, of the Columbia University School of Public Health, said, "You always expect to find some bacteria in any meat product. But those are usually harmless. I think the real surprise here was to find so many potentially disease-causing bacteria."

Even more, 90 percent of the bacteria Consumer Reports found were said to be resistant to antibiotics. In other words, they were super-bugs.

Rangan said, "All of these things paint a very concerning picture about this indiscriminate use of antibiotics in meat production in this country, and what we believe are the resulting consequences of that."

Consumer Reports was also alarmed by traces of ractopamine in one-fifth of pork they tested. Farmers use the drug on their hogs to produce leaner cuts of meat. It was originally developed to treat asthma, but never approved for human use.
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