Breaking News

Toronto Load More

OntarioLoad More

CanadaLoad More



Sunday, August 11, 2013

Want to know when you will die? Laser test tells us when we will meet our end

Scientists have designed a ‘death test’ which can tell you how long you are going to live.
The non-invasive laser test is able to determine when a person is going to die and is the first of its kind in the world.
A wristwatch-style device analyses the body's endothelial cells through the surface of the skin, measuring how the body will decline with age.
Pioneering: The 'death test' uses lasers to analyse blood cells in the body's capillaries and calculate how long a person has left to live (file photo)
Pioneering: The 'death test' uses lasers to analyse blood cells in the body's capillaries and calculate how long a person has left to live (file photo)
The endothelial cells are found in the capillaries, the body's smallest blood vessels, and responds to complex activity in other parts of our bodies.
The device, patented by scientists at a UK university, measures the flow from maximum to minimum in the endothelial cells, and analyses the result.

The outcome, graded from 0, meaning death, to 100, equalling optimum function, is then used by scientists to calculate the length of time before death.
The laser pulse can also test for diseases such as dementia and cancer, the Sunday Times reported.
Fatal results: The test, designed by UK scientists, measures the flow from maximum to minimum in the blood vessels' endothelial cells
Fatal results: The test, designed by UK scientists, measures the flow from maximum to minimum in the blood vessels' endothelial cells

The ‘death test’ was designed by two physics professors at Lancaster University, Aneta Stefanovska and Peter McClintock, with the help of government grants and medical charities.
‘I am hoping we will build a database that will become larger and larger so every person measured can be compared against it,’ Prof Stefanovska told the Sunday Times, adding that the predictions will become more accurate with more data.
Professors Stefanovska and McClintock told the newspaper a user-friendly version of their test is expected to be made available to GPs within three years.

Share This
Blogger
Facebook
Disqus

comments powered by Disqus

No comments:

Post a Comment

Subscribe
Stay Connected
Featured

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

© The Toronto Post All rights reserved